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John Perceval

Rhino,1981

oil on paper
36.5 x 49.5cm
$ 12,500 Gallery price

John de Burgh Perceval AO was a well-known Australian artist. Perceval was the last surviving member of a group known as the Angry Penguins who redefined Australian art in the 1940s, alongside Sidney Nolan, Albert Tucker, Arthur, Guy and David Boyd. Art critic Robert Hughes commented on Perceval's “spontaneous” approach, describing his works as “roly-poly art, full of gusto and bounce” often “done at breakneck speed: three to four hours, if that, suffice”. “Perceval relies on the expressive qualities of gesture more than any other local figurative painter. He is quite indifferent to iconographic form. It has no relevance to him, for there is no gap in his work between perception and act: only a lyrical, and essentially physical, immediacy of direct involvement.”

Courtesy of Private Collection, Melbourne.

Find out more about John and his work here.

 

LOCATION


926-930 High St, Armadale.

VIEWING

12-6pm, Monday 7 Sept. 2015

AUCTION

Monday 7 Sept. 2015
Cocktail party at 6.30pm followed by the Art Auction.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD CATALOGUE (7.5MB PDF)

CONTACT

Email:
Phone +61 3 9272 5699  

ADDRESS

Level 1, 306 Hawthorn Rd,
Caulfield South, VIC 3162
 
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John Perceval

Rhino,1981

oil on paper
36.5 x 49.5cm
$ 12,500 Gallery price

John de Burgh Perceval AO was a well-known Australian artist. Perceval was the last surviving member of a group known as the Angry Penguins who redefined Australian art in the 1940s, alongside Sidney Nolan, Albert Tucker, Arthur, Guy and David Boyd. Art critic Robert Hughes commented on Perceval's “spontaneous” approach, describing his works as “roly-poly art, full of gusto and bounce” often “done at breakneck speed: three to four hours, if that, suffice”. “Perceval relies on the expressive qualities of gesture more than any other local figurative painter. He is quite indifferent to iconographic form. It has no relevance to him, for there is no gap in his work between perception and act: only a lyrical, and essentially physical, immediacy of direct involvement.”

Courtesy of Private Collection, Melbourne.

Find out more about John and his work here.